Someone call HR!

How many conversations have you had as an HR leader where the employee in question … just isn’t getting it? You’ve tried appraisals, you’ve given them “the form”, their line managers are frustrated so have started communicating poorly. It’s a lose lose for you as an HR leader… next they will be on a performance […]

How many conversations have you had as an HR leader where the employee in question … just isn’t getting it?

You’ve tried appraisals, you’ve given them “the form”, their line managers are frustrated so have started communicating poorly. It’s a lose lose for you as an HR leader… next they will be on a performance improvement plan (groan).

So what if you could help them understand what’s going wrong …

Here’s my 3 coaching tips for evoking awareness for a deeper, thought provoking performance conversation:

Reflection: ask them to sit and think, for at least 5 minutes, in quiet space with you, about their performance – then ask them what comes up. Try 3 grounding breaths before you start to bring them into the space.

Feedback: ask them to seek more feedback, actively seeking open and honest dialogue, if it’s coupled with a direct question on the performance issue in hand it can be really eye opening for them if it happens repeatedly. It’s easy to defend  1 piece of feedback but not 3!
Get personal: what’s going on with the employee, take the time to listen to where they’re at, see if there is something going on behind the scenes – use what and how questions to further progress, such as:
What can we do differently next time?
How could we improve performance in this area?
This style makes them feel part of the solution rather than telling.

Self-awareness is an essential skill for personal and professional growth. By helping someone understand their strengths and weaknesses in a safe, judgment-free space, they can become more effective leaders and team members.

It can be a very vulnerable space for an employee when they are under performing, lack of self awareness is often driven by the fear of not being good enough. Take the time to help them reflect, work on open feedback, and seek opportunities to develop their self-awareness.

Finally, in a frantic and busy business – take the time to consider if you’re actively listening to this person, are you present in the moment? Have you observed anything different about them? Have you really heard what’s going on with them?

Last but not least, HR, take care of you! It’s tough taking on all of the performance issues all of the time, and it takes time equipping your managers to deal with these conversations effectively – so make sure you build in time to listen to your own physical and emotional needs, you can download my free resilience toolkit here.

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